Target 2 – Biodiversity values integrated

Aichi-02

Target 2 – Biodiversity values integrated

By 2020, at the latest, biodiversity values have been integrated into national and local development and poverty reduction strategies and planning processes and are being incorporated into national accounting, as appropriate, and reporting systems.

Key message

The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity presents a unique opportunity to incorporate biological and cultural diversity values into national economic strategies and planning for sustainable development. Joint implementation of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets alongside the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda opens the door for IPLCs to highlight their diverse local economies, customary sustainable use systems and traditional knowledge as forward-looking contributions to food security, community development and cultural renewal whilst conserving biodiversity and safeguarding Earth.

Summary of progress towards the target

Target 1 – Awareness of biodiversity increased

Target 1

Target 1 – Awareness of biodiversity increased

By 2020, at the latest, people are aware of the values of biodiversity and the steps they can take to conserve and use it sustainably.

Key message

The inter-relatedness of all forms of life, including the inextricable relationships between humans and nature, is central to the cultures of many IPLCs, who have much to offer in terms of raising awareness of multiple and diverse biodiversity values, conservation and sustainable use. Existing communication, education and awareness (CEPA) activities by IPLCs include the organisation of events; the production of written and audiovisual materials; the use of the internet and social media, and the facilitation of intercultural dialogue. IPLC networks also play an important role in raising awareness of global biodiversity perspectives among their members, by sharing policy information with communities in forms that are readily accessible to them.

Summary of progress towards the target

The Indigenous Women’s Biodiversity Network from Latin America and the Caribbean (RMIB-LAC)

The Indigenous Women’s Biodiversity Network from Latin America and the Caribbean (Red de Mujeres Indígenas sobre Biodiversidad de America Latina y el Caribe: RMIB-LAC) is an example of a network that is operating at different levels and tailors its approaches to serve and address various audiences. RMIB-LAC was founded in 1998 to create a space for a growing number of indigenous organisations, specifically indigenous women, to make their voices heard and to present their proposals in key decision-making arenas at international, regional and national levels. We focus on engaging indigenous women because women are central figures in the protection and transmission of traditional knowledge and practices in relation to the conservation of natural resources, through their teaching and everyday practices. For many indigenous peoples it is mostly the women who put spirituality into practice, by celebrating sacred rites and ceremonies.

Since its inception, RMIB-LAC has strengthened the capacities of hundreds of government representatives and indigenous peoples (mainly in the Latin American region). It has done this in various ways. Firstly, RMIB-LAC develops capacity-building activities to raise public awareness of the values of biodiversity and its sustainable use, complementing what most schools are teaching children about biodiversity. We base our activities on the principle that you cannot value what you do not know, and therefore our work has focused on explaining what biodiversity is, in order that people should be familiar with all its components and their interrelationships. RMIB-LAC also organises training workshops to engage both traditional and state authorities. We work and collaborate with universities and environmental organisations and involve young people, women and men in our workshops.

RMIB-LAC also organises “intercultural dialogues” with national governments. When government representatives from the region speak of biodiversity they tend to do so only in technical terms, which prevents effective communication. This has been overcome through intercultural dialogues in villages, where indigenous peoples connect scientific concepts to indigenous words used to describe the same concepts. This process has enabled the creation of a communication bridge to implement decisions and initiatives for the conservation of biodiversity.

Targets

Targets

There are 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets in the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020, grouped into five Strategic Goals. This page provides key messages and recommendations for each Strategic Goal and summarises IPLCs' perspectives on and contributions to each Target.

Strategic Goal A

Address the underlying causes of biodiversity loss by mainstreaming biodiversity across government and society

Strategic Goal B

Reduce the direct pressures on biodiversity and promote sustainable use

Strategic Goal C

Improve the status of biodiversity by safeguarding ecosystems, species and genetic diversity

Strategic Goal D

Enhance the benefits to all from biodiversity and ecosystem services

Strategic Goal E

Enhance implementation through participatory planning, knowledge management and capacity-building

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Local Biodiversity Outlooks

Local Biodiversity Outlooks presents the perspectives and experiences of indigenous peoples and local communities on the current social-ecological crisis, and their contributions to the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

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Global Biodiversity Goals

Global Biodiversity Goals

The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 is framed along five strategic goals. This page provides a summary of the importance of each of these five goals for IPLCS; how they experience progress and contribute to each goal, and key recommended actions to accelerate progress towards achieving the Goal.

Strategic Goal A

Address the underlying causes of biodiversity loss by mainstreaming biodiversity across government and society

      

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Strategic Goal B

Reduce the direct pressures on biodiversity and promote sustainable use

          

Read More

Strategic Goal C

Improve the status of biodiversity by safeguarding ecosystems, species and genetic diversity

    

Read More

Strategic Goal D

Enhance the benefits to all from biodiversity and ecosystem services

    

Read More

Strategic Goal E

Address the underlying causes of biodiversity loss by mainstreaming biodiversity across government and society

     

Read More

About this site

About this site

Local Biodiversity Outlooks presents the perspectives and experiences of indigenous peoples and local communities on the current social-ecological crisis, and their contributions to the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

The first edition of Local Biodiversity Outlooks was produced in 2016 as a complement to the fourth edition of the Global Biodiversity Outlook and has become a key source of evidence about the actions and contributions of IPLCs towards achieving the objectives of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

In 2016, at the thirteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (COP-13), Parties welcomed the first edition and requested a second edition to be launched in conjunction with the fifth edition of the Global Biodiversity Outlook in 2020. Local Biodiversity Outlooks 2 has been prepared in response to that request through a collaboration of the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity, the Indigenous Women’s Biodiversity Network, the Centres of Distinction on Indigenous and Local Knowledge, Forest Peoples Programme and the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

It brings together information and case studies from indigenous peoples, local communities and community-based organisations around the world, with information from published academic and non-academic sources.